Reviews of Guardian Angel

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Here are the reviews, in alphabetic order of reviewer:
Roberta Abba
Anonymous
Greg Austin
Beverley Bateman
Margaret Carter
Dorothy Carroll
Karen Cioffi-Ventrice
Gary Clough
Toni DeMaio
Joan Edwards
Gwen
Carolyn Harris
Rachael Kane
Kora
Jay Levy
Oscar Metcalfe
Rajat Mitra
J. J. Miller
Geoff Nelder
David Norman
James Overton
Jennifer Poulter
Natalie Rich
Margaret Tanner
Michael Thal
Christina St Clair
Ana Luisa Santiago
Sandra Warren
Florence Weinberg
Kristin Yodock

Roberta Abba

   "Guardian Angel" is a story that touches the heart. Although it is set in a small Australian town in the 1850s, its message is universal and timeless: unconditional love has the power to bring out the best in people and overcome hate, ignorance and intolerance. We need more Maraglindis in the world and more people to read the book and spread its message.


Anonymous

   Dr Bob Rich's book, Guardian Angel, was riveting from the first few pages. Bob's a great storyteller who fleshes out his characters with raw honesty and insight. While it is an ancient tale of good versus evil, its time and setting make it enthralling, historically interesting and informative as the appalling behaviour of the colonials is detailed in rather gruesome ways and is offset by the influence of a young spirit of goodness...... This is a book I will recommend to many friends.


Greg Austin

   Inspiring -- a terrific read from a visionary writer, thoroughly recommend. I was immersed in the settings and loved the Start.


Beverley A. Bateman

   GUARDIAN ANGEL is an intriguing book set in the Victorian Age in Australia. It immediately draws you in to that world, but with a touch of the paranormal. If you enjoyed ASCENDING SPIRAL, you'll enjoy this book. If you enjoy a complex plot, with well-developed characters and a journey of development, with history thrown in, you'll enjoy this book. Maraglindi is a special person, with a journey that involves learning about the human species and the pain involved with people who live under continuous threats to their live, but believe that people who love you and whom you love are the only thing important in life. Read the book and follow her journey.


Margaret L. Carter

   The depth of the author's research is clear in the vividly presented details of Aboriginal life under colonial rule, in both physical and social dimensions. I was fascinated by the beauty of their culture and the harshness of their lives as shown in this story, especially the effects of European encroachment upon their traditional world. The Australian setting comes alive in descriptions of the landscape and its flora and fauna. Characters, both major and minor, are portrayed in three dimensions with their virtues, flaws, and human confusion. The only reservation I might have is that some of the antagonists repent and reform more quickly and thoroughly than one might expect even under the influence of an "angel unaware." On the whole, though, GUARDIAN ANGEL impresses me as a believable and heart-rending story of redemption in the face of cruelty and ignorance.


Dorothy Carroll

   Dr Bob Rich has always written insightfully and with this book there is no exception. There is no doubt he is a skilled a writer who draws people into his world of imagination. We can all benefit from spending time reading his words. I fully recommend this book.


Karen Cioffi-Ventrice

   Guardian Angel is a story of acceptance and love. Set in 19th century New South Wales Australia, it tells of a young aborigine woman who is raped. The child born from this violence endures prejudice and hatred during her 14 years on earth. But, through kindness she turns the hearts of those around her and goes on to guide them after death. This is a poignant story by Dr. Bob Rich.

   Karen Cioffi, award-winning children's author and ghostwriter.


Gary Clough

   I'm a builder: a simple bloke with no pretensions to high-faluting knowledge about anything much. So, I don't know how accurate Bob Rich's picture of the Victorian times is. All I can say is that he took me there. It was real.

   Like, a 12 year old boy from a wealthy family was near death, and his parents couldn't show him any love. It was NOT DONE. A poor convict servant could. This seems right.

   I used to have a Koori man work for me, and some of the stories he told me of the life of his family make me believe everything Bob Rich writes about things like "buck hunts" and casual rape of Aboriginal women, and then judging them as sluts.

   But in a way, all this is background. The story told in that setting is powerful, unputtable-down, even makes you pass up on the shows on the idiot box. I spent much of a weekend just reading, till the end, which can only be described as beautiful.

   Do yourself a favour and read this story when you have a chance.

   I know Bob is working on the sequel, and I hope he hurries up about it.


Toni DeMaio

   In a world that in too many ways eerily echoes the intolerance and ignorance of days passed, Guardian Angel by Dr Bob Rich reminds us that love is the most powerful force on earth and beyond.

   Meet Maraglindi, an ancient soul who visits earth to inspire us all to more selfless actions and to remember we are a global community of souls with the divine spark of life linking us together as a global community.

   This story takes you on an adventure that will keep you at the edge of your seat, and later, when the last page has been turned, missing the time you spent learning about this miraculous Guardian Angel who visited our planet on more than one occasion. I recommend this skillfully, artfully written work to everyone with a beating heart and the ability to believe love will be our saving grace in the end. I can't wait for Dr Bob Rich's next book! I'm a fan!


Joan Y. Edwards

   Dr. Bob Rich created fascinating characters in Guardian Angel. Some are evil; others return love for hatred. This book shows how prejudice against others because of the color of their skin, different culture, or different religious beliefs affected an area and how it changed due to the love poured out to others by a half-aboriginal girl in spite of the cruel treatment she received.


Gwen

   I loved the message within this story, I feel like I can apply the lessons within this book to live today, it was so beautiful to read and applicable even to society today, thank you for a lovely read.

   Gwen


Carolyn Harris

   I thought I'd written a review, but maybe it will show up somewhere else. It certainly won't be wasted because anything that Bob Rich writes is worthy of all the 5 star reviews he receives for his book.

   This one, Guardian Angel, deals with reincarnation, but takes on the burden of those Australians that were here long long ago before White Australians arrived and set everything into turmoil.

   That our Guardian Angel is born over and over, sent to try and bring about change between the Aboriginal founders of Australia and those white people who thought they were supreme is a bit thing for her to take on, but life after life she slowly brings about the changes that we are now seeing in our present day and, which will continue until there are no red necks left and only people coming together.

   It's well written and thought provoking.


Rachael Kane

   Guardian Angel by Bob Rich was a very enjoyable book. The characters were well developed, the story drew me in from the first few pages and I enjoyed how the story unfolded in an unpredictable way. Bob set the scene well and explained Aboriginal custom and nuances of that era of Australian history in an engaging way that would be accessible to a wide audience. I would recommend this book as a good read that provokes thought and reflection on a multitude of levels.


Kora

   This book is a triumph of the virtuous, suppressed, abused, ostracized etc. The ill-doing of people is endless and constantly happens in many shapes and forms and each society. Aboriginal native inhabitants of Australia were subjects of many atrocities in 1850's and equivalent to animals according to the whites, however the white men of high standards performed many acts of savagery worse than the animals. Human race is in trouble and self destructive even nowadays; it desperately needs impressive people like Bob Rich with touching writings like "the Guardian Angel". Bob Rich is a little pencil in the hand of a writing God, who is sending a message to the world.


Jay Levy

   Dr. Rich takes us back in time to another world in an effort to help us get perspective on the current mistreatment of others and the importance of upholding diversity through acceptance and love. His novel begins in a small town located in New South Wales Australia during Victorian times. It tells a story marked by the mistreatment of aboriginal people by white colonists/invaders. Maraglindi, an aborigine girl was born out of the violent and hateful act perpetrated upon her mother who was raped. Nevertheless, or perhaps as testament to the spirit of peace and love, she becomes the ultimate guide to our redemption and ultimate salvation.

   Maraglindi dies a violent death at a young age, but her spirit lives on. She is reincarnated and it soon becomes clear that she is a guardian angel striving to help create a better world by visiting the lives of others who have been stricken by violence, prejudice and intolerance. All who have their lives touched by Maraglindi's loving spirit soon learn compassion for others and spread its message to their neighbors. Guardian Angel is a story well worth reading. It instills hope! When we join one another in community, as opposed to divisiveness and hatred, a better future awaits us all.


Oscar Metcalfe

   I've spent time living and travelling with people living close to natural environs, far removed from the urban lives most of us experience. This author speaks with uncommon sensitivity about the bush and its ways and rhythms, and of characters whose kin descendents can still be found in remoter and rural corners, shying neither from the delicate and unassuming beauty, nor the occasional brutality, the echoes of which are still apparent in the frontier mentality of some people in this country.

   Speaking personally, it resonated with some of my own family history from New Zealand, relationships and ancestors born neither from love nor into it, yet still pushing back against that which was harsh to produce strong lines, especially of women.

   If you seek a story that slips in and textures your everyday reality, you'll find it here.


Rajat Mitra

   I read the book 'Guardian Angel' with many wonderful feelings that I hadn't felt in a while. It opened a little unknown world for me that I didn't know existed. It is the story of a young girl who is born as a result of an assault by a white man on an aboriginal woman and her coming of age in the midst of many hardships. There were people who loved her and saw her uniqueness as a healer and those who judged her by the color of her skin.

   As an Indian, one born a little after India's independence, though I didn't face direct racism from the white race, my father did and our family was full of stories about how we faced discrimination and humiliation at the hands of the British. In the book when the author talks of how the whites held the aborigines in contempt and hatred, it made me aware of a painful legacy that our country still carries. I can very well relate to it as it still pervades our life in many ways. The first thing that struck me about the book was the clash of two cultures, two different ways of being and the one that the invading culture destroyed that of the native people. Similar thing happened in many parts of Indian subcontinent. Many missionaries even today justify the spread of Christianity by saying aborigines are little better than animals, are animists and therefore they are not doing anything wrong by converting forgetting that animism is a faith too and as powerful as any other faith.

   The character of Maraglindi is both fascinating and immersive and takes one to a different world. The description of the sights, sounds of the those early days reminded me of a time when life was much simpler and people wanted to live in peace in the laps of mother nature, but one that was cruelly snatched from them. Maraglindi's journey from an aboriginal girl to a woman who wins respect through her healing powers in the midst of this turbulence is therefore deeply touching and reminds one of life's fragility and our commitment to forgive and move on. My only contention is that though she appears real and compassionate, I would have liked to know more of her inner struggles, if any.

   Her story is a reminder that love can make inroads in the midst of bigotry and hatred and negotiate one's way in life even though everything is against you. She is an unforgettable character.

   Even though she meets a tragic end, her legacy continues through her people she has transformed. Every land which has been colonized and suffered extinction of natives has stories of people like Maraglindi who stood as a bridge of peace between the invading and the native culture and who remind us of the violence that has taken place in the name of God.

   The book has many powerful insights. When Gerald says how the whites see land as one to buy and sell but for the natives their bond to the land they live on is permanent. When Maraglindi's family refuses to leave saying that they will die if they leave their land, I could understand as this was the belief in my countrymen and a value that never made us invade others.

   A must read for those who need to understand the clash between east and west and how the world changed because of that conflict.


J. J. Miller

   Thank you Dr Bob Rich for taking us back to a time in our history many Australians still know little about. You have blended fiction and fantasy with historical realism, to paint a compelling tale of life in mid 19th Century outback New South Wales. Maraglindi is a small but powerfully binding force, touching and altering the lives of all who come to know her. A good and very satisfying read.


Geoff Nelder

   A unique morality tale

   It takes a brave writer to tackle racism and prejudice even in this 'enlightened' age where slavery is technically forbidden. Dr Bob Rich lays into the theme with zeal, but with a cunning writer's craft so the story is rich, page turning and unforgettable. Set in Victorian Australia, a numinous spirit from the universe – if you will – has the task of steering humanity towards the engagement of love rather than hatred. The spirit is manifested in Maraglindi, an aboriginal girl. In spite of heinous acts against 'the people', love is to shine over hatred. Does it though? You have to read it yourself.

   You'll enjoy the writing. Where you can tell horses are galloping near via 'the drumming in the soles of his bare feet'; 'smell the scent of the gum trees'; and when 'Mrs Mac laughed her silvery laugh.'

   Guardian Angel is more than a story, more than an epic tale, it's an ineffable message for us all.


David Norman

   Another masterful novel by this author. They just keep coming.

   Would love audio versions of his books so I could listen to 'hands-free' while traveling or doing other tasks.


James M. Overton

   I recently had the privilege of reading Guardian Angel by Bob Rich again and found it even more enthralling the second time round. It is a novel of Australia, but the message within applies to all men and women everywhere and in every time. It is couched within the framework of Christianity, but it applies equally to any and all religions that preach a message of love and acceptance. Reincarnation is a thread that runs through this story, and shows how our actions are not limited to one life, but reverberate through many incarnations as we strive to learn the lessons necessary for our growth.

   The protagonist, a young Aboriginal girl, Maraglindi, is born of an act of hate, but she typifies Love in its most elemental form, and all who come in contact with her during her short life are touched by this love. It changes their behaviour for the better, and each one spreads this message of love to others, enveloping families and communities. But this is so much more than just a story with a message; it is a history. Guardian Angel is a story set against the backdrop of Colonial Australia, where we get to experience the lives of rich and poor, privileged and deprived, the white overlords and the downtrodden, dispossessed Aboriginal First People of this glorious country.

   Guardian Angel is a book I would not hesitate to recommend, not just as a story that describes the racial discord of earlier times, but also as one that holds out a hope that things can be different. We live in times where hate is rearing its ugly head once more, so we need stories like this to remind us that hate can be overcome, not by violence and more hatred, but by love.


Jennifer Poulter

   Dr Bob Rich, an avid historical researcher, has taken on an extremely challenging historical theme, that of racial prejudice as experienced by Indigenous Australians. It is no mean task! Many publishers will not tackle publication of such a subject as Indigenous Australians themselves are divided as to the rights of white Australians to write about Indigenous history featuring Indigenous central characters. Bravo Bob!


Natalie Rich

   Moving and sincere. As always, worth reading :)


Margaret Tanner

   Set in 1850's Australia.

   Glindi, an aboriginal woman, gives birth to a baby girl who she names Maraglindi (Glindi's sorrow).

   Born during violent times when aboriginal men were treated worse than their Masters' dogs, the woman suffered even more. Their only use was to satisfy their owner's lust, and keep his house in order.

   Against this horrific background the author has woven a rich story of love, hate, decency and depravity, that once you start reading you won't be able to put it down until you have devoured every word. It is quite obvious the author has done extensive historical research before he wrote this story.

   Highly recommended.


Michael Thal

   Guardian Angel by Dr. Bob Rich is set during the mid 19th Century in rural Australia. An angel is assigned to live amongst the humans in an Aboriginal community in New South Wales. Her soul was planted in the body of a girl whose Aboriginal mother was raped by an Australian settler. Her mission is to teach universal love. She chose a female body because, "I have always favored being the life form that bears new life." After this introduction we read about "the life of Maraglindi, child of the land, fruit of an evil deed, and instrument of love."

   Maraglindi is a Jesus figure without the preaching. Her ministry is simply showing love and passing on her affection for others through the power of her touch. Starting life off as Mick and Glindi's baby, she has green eyes—white man eyes—but Mick does not blame his wife. Glindi would prefer her husband kill the rapist, but wiser voices prevail. "If you do and they find out it's one of the people, they'll do terrible payback."

   When Maraglindi was still a toddler, Bruce MacCaffery, the nicest white man in New South Wales, hired her parents. Mick's job was to tame horses and Glindi would work in Mrs. Mac's home as a servant. Eventually, Mrs. Mac discovers Maraglindi's intelligence and goodness and takes the child under her wing calling her Mary Fisher. When Mary became school age, Mrs. Mac enrolls her in Talbot Ladies' College where Maraglindi learns very quickly about racial prejudice and hatred.

   Dr. Bob Rich has created an extremely memorable character in his guardian angel, Maraglindi. The little Aboriginal child affects everyone she meets. Take the boy Gerald, who commits a heinous crime with his buddies and almost died from food poisoning. Once recovered, Gerald Kline grew up to become an Anglican preacher dedicating his life to the Lord and helping the Aborigines.

   This writer's favorite character is Kirsten, an older student at Talbot who hated Maraglindi on sight. Mary's capacity for love eventually turns Kirsten around to become one of Maraglindi's best friends. How the author managed this miracle is told in a very dramatic scene that will keep you breathless.

   Guardian Angel is a sad, but inspirational story that will leave readers with a strong sense of hope and a feeling that life has endless possibilities. Once we put the needs of others ahead of our own we'll begin to learn the lessons of universal love.


Christina St Clair

   This was an enjoyable read. The main character, Maraglindi, is a special being who was born as an aborigine during the times (1850) when the native people of Australia were subject to horrible bigotry and slaughter. Glindi is full of light and love which helps everyone grow spiritually. The book utilizes the concepts of reincarnation and also the teachings of Christ about unconditional love. I particularly appreciated learning about Aboriginal culture.


Ana Luisa Santiago

   Guardian Angel touches the cultural history of Victorian era of Australia, including religion and reincarnation. With strong characters from the beginning. Maraglindi's mission of love that affects everyone she comes in contact with. Racism and hatred are also present in this story. Which has real resonance in today's battles.

   Truly enjoyed reading this story.


Sandra Warren

   The title of Dr. Bob Rich's new novel, Guardian Angel, sets the tone for the story of a young Aboriginal girl, Maraglindi, who touches the lives of all she meets in unexpected ways, breaking through barriers of hate and prejudice towards the Australian Aboriginal people, by opening stone cold hearts to love. Of particular interest is the interaction between Maraglindi, an Aboriginal child and Kirsten, a Caucasian school mate, who at first seems unreachable as she spreads hate throughout the school toward the only Aboriginal student in the all-white school, but is eventually won over by Maraglindi's unfailing spirit.

   Maraglindi's message of acceptance, hope and love is universal and much needed around the world today, especially here in the United States of America; a country divided as never before, not by skin color, origin of birth or religion, but rather by political belief systems.

   While reading Guardian Angel, I couldn't help but think of another who came to earth, led a challenging life of suffering, and left a legacy of love through his teachings. Dr. Bob Rich, through Guardian Angel, has created a memorable character that is likely to leave a lasting impression on those fortunate enough to pick up this wonderful book. The spirit of Maraglindi will live on in the hearts of all who read her story.


Florence Weinberg

   Guardian Angel by Dr. Bob Rich pulls no punches. Set in the era of Queen Victoria, its major themes are two: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you, and, all human beings deserve equal respect and treatment regardless of sex, color of skin, age, wealth, or place of origin.

   A highly superior being from elsewhere in the universe is assigned the task of leading human beings to the ideal state of perfect love. This being becomes Maraglindi, nicknamed "Mary" by the whites who cannot pronounce her name, a child of the dispossessed Aboriginal people of New South Wales. As she grows, she demonstrates to all who come in contact with her just what love and the Golden Rule can do. There is, however, one barrier to her ability to spread love, peace and understanding: the negative force of hatred and prejudice. She cannot prevail against a completely closed mind.

   In and around a beautifully portrayed 19th-century village, the battle between ultimate good and evil plays out before us. There is much violence and bloodshed in this novel, but also much hope and goodness. Dr. Bob Rich's powerful work, while set in the past, is deeply relevant today, as we witness hatred and prejudice spread by persons in powerful places, through the power of modern media. We need you, Maraglindi! Come, Guardian Angel!


Kristin Yodock

   I had the pleasure of reading, Guardian Angel, by Dr. Bob Rich. It's a riveting story set in rural Australia with an eclectic assortment of characters. There's a fascinating angel, who is assigned to live with the humans. She becomes a girl whose Aboriginal mother was raped by an Australian settler, Maraglindi, who is a sort of a Jesus figure. There is also Bruce MacCaffery, one of the kindest white men in New South Wales.

   Kirsten, an older student at Talbot Ladies' College, detested Maraglindi on sight. Mary's powers of persuasion eventually turned Kirsten around to become one of Maraglindi's best friends.

   Last night I picked up the book, began to read, and I couldn't put it down. I found it to be an inspirational story that left me with a strong sense of hope and a feeling that life has eternal promise.

   The book is significant in that it reveals how prejudice against others because of the color of their skin or their religion affects us all. Guardian Angel shows that love tears down suppression, and compassion stomps out abuse. I would recommend this book to anyone who is looking for something new to read.

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